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Arthurian Romances

The World Pertaining to King Arthur

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Mythology

We’re down to the wire with my book on King Arthur being on sale for FREE!

This link will take you to the book wherever you are in this world!

http://authl.it/5sa

or CLICK HERE

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Thanks so much for all your support!!!

 

All My Best,

Jill

 

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The Infinite Character of King Arthur on Sale this Sunday!

 

This Sunday for my son’s 13th birthday, I will be giving away, “The Infinite Character of King Arthur” for Free!!!

Here’s the link below

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00T72LS7Q

The next part of the series will launch next week!  Book Two is titled “Mystical People and Places Accessing Supernatural Elements in the Arthurian Legends”.  

I am really excited about this one. It’s taking two of my favorite subject matter and putting them together.  So keep an eye out for my posts and emails this weekend and the coming weeks!

You can get a look at Infinite Arthur HERE!

Arthurian Quote from Le Morte d’Arthur

Now I have warned thee of thy vain glory and of thy pride, that thou hast many times erred against thy Maker. Beware of everlasting pain, for of all earthly knights I have most pity of thee, for I know well thou hast not thy peer on any earthy sinful man.


A recluse to Launcelot, 713

These words, spoken during the quest for the Sangreal, touch on Lancelot’s spiritual failings, and help to define the epic’s shift into a more Christian work. On the quest for the Sangreal, Lancelot has a hard time accepting the idea that he might not achieve his goal. After all, he has always been the world’s greatest knight. However, this pride is precisely what keeps him from fulfilling the goal. Finding the Sangreal requires spiritual fortitude, not just physical strength. The recluse’s words reveal to Lancelot that his best path is to repent of his sins. Redemption, another major theme of Le Morte d’Arthur, proves quite important to Lancelot’s story arc. Here, we see the beginning of Lancelot’s spiritual trial.

Arthurian Quote of the Day 

  

For madam, I love not to be constrained to love; for love must arise of the heart, and not by no constraint.
Lancelot to Guinevere, 826

Le Morte D’Arthur 

  
After the body of Elaine (the Fair Maiden of Astolat) arrives, Lancelot is confronted by Guinevere  about his guilt in her death. She accuses him of not loving Elaine, and hence causing her death. This reply both confirms the all-consuming power of love and Lancelot’s devotion to Guinevere. He is subtly reminding her that love cannot be controlled, and that he remains devoted to her not by choice but by love. However, he also reveals unwittingly that it has power beyond the lover’s desires. He never meant to destroy King Arthur’s kingdom, but his all-powerful love for Guinevere required as much, and so this answer serves as foreshadowing. King Arthur approves of Lancelot’s statement, though he misses its subtlety.

The Vorbing by Stewart Stafford 

  
The Vorbing is a must read for all. Mr. Stafford (who is in my opinion a brilliant writer) takes the Vampire myth and turns it on it’s end by keeping to the original myths and dare I say history. In this fantastic novel vampires are neither gorgeous nor sparkling like most most fantasy novels or tv shows on the CW (The Vampire Diaries and the Originals). The novel keeps to traditional Celtic lore and as the series names is the Vampire Creation Myth. The characters keep you reading and the vampires keep you invested in this new haunting series. Grab your copy today on Amazon and enjoy being spooked even more this Halloween!

Have a Wonderful Sunday! Here’s Your Arthurian Quote of the Day…

  

One day, a King will come, and the Sword will rise… again.


Excalibur (1981), written by Rospo Pallenberg and John Boorman, based on Le Morte d’Arthur by Thomas Malory

Arthurian Quote of the Day!

  

Ask ev’ry person if he’s heard the story;

And tell it strong and clear if he has not:

That once there was a fleeting wisp of glory

Called Camelot.

Camelot! Camelot!



Camelot (1960; 1967) written by Alan Jay Lerner, based on The Once and Future King (1958) by T.H. White

Arthurian book on sale!

Hi All!
I’ve updated The Infinite Character of King Arthur and you save 50% with the Kindle edition!

And that’s 50% wherever you are! Not just Amazon in the US!

Grab your copy HERE today!

And as always, Thank You for your support! 🙂

All My Best,
Jill M Roberts

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All My Best,
Jill M Roberts

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